Sort of Milestone

on The Economist China Summit// Beijing, Nov'14
Today is exactly three months I have been working with Rehab-Robotics Company in Hong Kong. It is medical device company, which has main product - sEMG-driven robotic arm for after stroke rehabilitation. I am responsible for business development in Europe and America. 
with Tommy// Moscow, Dec'14

In the past three months we have attened four exhibitions - two in Germany (Dusseldorf - Rehacare, Medica), one in Indonesia (Jakarta) and just came back from Russia (Moscow). Many people were wondering what do I think about Hong Kong. The answer I would put in this way: 
Some time ago The Economist in one of the articles about South Korea wrote: "The only people unimpressed by South Korea's accomplishments.. are South Koreans itself". When you come to Hong Kong as a tourist, you truly impressed by this global city. When you started to work here, you see another side. 
So far I would call my lifestyle here as WES mode. WES stands for Work-Eat-Sleep. 12-14 hours daily, often weekend (due to exhibitions and preparations). Every month I am "out" of Hong Kong for ten days on average for trips. My flatmate is happy. If you think it's so great to go to business trip to another country, think twice. From my experience, after being full day at the booth, the only thing you want to do after is go to hotel and sleep. And time just flies and you find yourself in the airplane on the way back. Of course you can grab half day when arrive to go out, but it's just different when you travel by your own or with friends.
Signing distibution agreement with Turkey// Dusseldorf, Nov'14
The strangiest thing is I like it. No one asked me to work this WES hours (but due to time differences I need to talk to potential distributors by phone, so 11PM way back home just comes naturally. To do international BD is similar to "in-country" BD, the only differences are in names of the countries and languages. It's fun to talk with someone from Portugal and then 10 min later with someone from Poland and then  20 min after with a medical device distributor from Turkey. Markets vary, different conditions, stages of development. For example, Romania doesn't have a habit to use advanced robotics for rehabilitation, government is not ready to pay for it. Polish market is sort of matured and money are coming from EU funds, so companies are eager to buy from you. Russia has it's own "specs" - one year long certification process with estimated cost between Euro 12K to Euro 40K (CE is not accepted). Yes, in addition it's more comlex.

I learned a lot about strokeneuroplasticityneurorehabilitation from research papers, wikipedia and daily discussion with people I work. Did you know that stroke is leadng cause of long-term of disability among adults and third cause of death? WHO with World Stroke Organization say one in every 6 people will suffer stroke in his/her lifetime. Medical device industry is new to me and I could never imagine it is so deep and broad.


Also I took part in three great events: The Economist Innovation Summit (as birthday present in Oct), The Economist China Summit (already my second in Nov) and APAC Innovation Summit (organized by Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks early this Dec). I will write about them more detailed in the upcoming posts.

The theory of personal growth and development says that 70% of our growth comes from challenging work, 20% are based on feedback from supervisor and 10% from training classes and reading realted materials. But sometimes challenges become painful. In the gym if you put too much pressure on muscles - it might hurt. To find a right balance is a way to make sure you don't fall on the route, but finish whole marthon before final gang.

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